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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 96 (some duplicates have been removed)
. the u.s. trade gap narrows as the world buys more made in america products and the u.s. buys less foreign oil. >> susie: and with gas prices rising, chevy hopes its new diesel chevy cruze will attract buyers looking for more miles per gallon. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: millions of people are bracing tonight for a powerful snow storm that could cripple the east coast. some forecasters say this could be the blizzard of the century with record amounts of snow and extremely strong winds. in parts of the northeast, transportation was shut down. the governors of massachusetts and connecticut declared a state of emergency and banned car travel, train service and cancelled flights in and out of boston. while the worst of the storm has yet to hit, many businesses and cities were busy making preparations today. erika miller reports. >> reporter: this monstrous storm is already being compared to the great blizzard of '78, when vast amounts of snow blanketed the ohio valley and the great lakes. that storm lasted 36 hours, leaving cars stranded. this storm could also b
pushing up fuel prices. those higher prices come as gasoline is also on the rise. joining us now with the outlook for energy, alan harry. he's portfolio manager and c.e.o. of the spartan commodity fund. alan, let me first start off by talking to you about home heating oil. we saw prices up this week 3%. what is the trend going forward? >> well, thank you for having me. what i look at right now is short term we're going up a little bit more. longer term we're heading down. two, three weeks we're going to go up just a little bit more. after that, down we go. >> susie: why is that? >> well, i think we're coming to the close of the heating season. we already have an idea of what days we have left of heating. and it's not using up enough. so they've kept a lot in reserve, a lot of speculation coming to the market, and it's not getting used up. two, three weeks we have a great idea of where we will sit heating season wise. after that, down we go displuz for most of the u.s., households use natural gas. they don't use heating oil. and the ones that do are mostly in the northeast. so com
billion merger between anheuser busch-inbev and mexican brewer modelo. using company documents to bolster their case, justice department lawyers says the deal will lead to higher prices for popular beers like budweiser and corona. anheuser-busch inbev says it is still confident the deal will go through. as darren gersh reports, the fight could be a sign more mergers will face a tougher time in washington. >> reporter: the justice department is not quite ready for a two-pack of brewers to control almost half the american beer market. in a statement announcing a lawsuit to block anheuser-bush inbev's $20 billion deal for mexican brewer modelo, assistant attorney general bill baer says >> if abi fully owned and controlled modelo, a.b.i. would be able to increase beer prices to american consumers. this lawsuit seeks to prevent a.b.i. from eliminating modelo as an important competitive force in the beer industry. anheuser-busch was not deterred, saying: >> we remain confident in our position, and we intend to vigorously contest the justice department's action in federal court. >> reporter: the
." agreement from the u.s. department of education's ready to lea grant, and viewers like y, thank yo visit pbskidsgo.org where you can play a lot of games for your favorite characters and win votes, too. go ahead, what are you waiting for? hey, you... cut it! (laughing) that's awkward. (laughter) put your -- put it -- sorry! put your name on your mind and... (laughter) captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> tom: good evening. i'm tom hudson. susie is off tonight. wall street's rally extends to a second day, erasing much of the week's losses and pushing the dow to a five year high. helping the markets higher were more commitments by the federal reserve to keep doing what its doing, until the economy improves. but a sour day for apple shareholders, as c.e.o. tim cook sheds little light on how the company plans to use its hoard of cash. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! for the second day in a row, federal reserve chairman ben bernanke told congress the central bank is not about to change its strategy, and for a second day, a strong rally on wall street. the dow surged 175 points
numbers are a positive sign for the u.s. economy. investors were worried about some not so good signals today about europe's economy. stocks turned negative on comments from europe's central bank president saying the strong euro could dampen europe's recovery. here on wall street, the dow fell 42 points, the nasdaq lost three and the s&p slipped over two points. >> tom: still ahead, douglas burtnick joins us, he's with aberdeen asset management. >> susie: a battle is brewing between a big name hedge fund investor and apple. at issue: how to get apple to unlock value for shareholders. today david einhorn of greenlight capital sued apple to block a move that would stop the use of preferred shares. shareholders will vote on this at apple's annual meeting on february 27. what einhorn is proposing is that apple pay out more of its cash hoard to investors, using a special kind of preferred stock. einhorn has a lot at stake: his fund owns more than one million shares of apple, and while the stock rose a bit today, it's down 35% since its peak of $700 last september. late today apple issued thi
. >> reporter: with earnings season winding down, wall street could use some new headlines to chew on. good economic data would be nice. friendly washington politics would also be helpful. tonight's state of the union speech might give investors a clue as to whether that's likely to happen. veteran trader teddy weissberg is hoping president obama will stress the need for bipartisanship but isn't sure that's what he'll hear. >> in terms of tonight, i don't think anybody that i talk to in the wall street arena expects to hear anything terribly dramatic one way or another. >> reporter: since lawmakers and the white house kicked the proverbial can down the road around new years, the stock market has rallied rather nicely. the s&p 500 is up nearly 7% and the dow is about 150 points away from its all-time high. of course, stocks have been getting help from corporate america, too. it turns out fourth quarter profits were better than expected, led by the housing sector and financial firms. >> about 345 companies have reported so far, of which 70% have beaten earnings expectations and 66% have beate
of italian bonds was well received, fending off new worries about the european debt crisis. and here in the u.s., january durable goods orders rose almost 2%, for their largest gain in over a year, and well above expectations for a modest 0.2% gain. the stock market got no help today from technology giant apple, apple shares slipped about one percent after investors were disappointed nothing concrete came out of the company's annual shareholder meeting. no word on a stock split, new product or most of all what apple plans to do with all its cash. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: "a" is for apple, and it turns apple is for cash, and holding on to lots of it. despite ample pressure from investors, c.e.o. tim cook still has no concrete plans for the company's $137 billion war chest. at apple's annual shareholder meeting today, cook said the company's board remained in quote very, very active discussions about options for cash sharing. some apple experts say the tech giant is more likely to divulge those options some time in march. >> i think they can modestly raise the dividend and modestly inc
.e.o. tim cook sheds little light on how the company plans to use its hoard of cash. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! for the second day in a row, federal reserve chairman ben bernanke told congress the central bank is not about to change its strategy, and for a second day, a strong rally on wall street. the dow surged 175 points to a five year high, the nasdaq added 32, the s&p was up 19 points. investors and traders warmed to the federal reserve chairman's steadfast support of the central bank's bond buying spree, he thinks the asset purchases are necessary to keep interest rates low in order to spur growth and boost hiring. the fed has been buying $85 billion a month in american i.o.u.'s since last september. while it won't stop the strategy, it will soon start talking about how to stop. >> we haven't done a new review of the exit strategy yet. i think we will have to do that sometime soon. even if we don't sell any securities, it doesn't mean that our balance sheet is going to be large for many years, it just would be maybe an extra year, that's all it would take to get down to a mor
companies, and investors are seeing in the u.s. economy. we preview the economic state of the union. why regulators need to treat them like other business. then u.s. airways sees big benefits in merging with american airlines. we look at the new landscape for airlines if the deal goes through. we have that anmore tonight on nbr. president obama is preparing to deliver his first state of the union address of his new term, tomorrow. the american people will be listening carefully to his plans to grow the economy, especially as they struggle with less take home pay, and worries about their jobs. while there are signs of improvement in the economy, the unemployment rate rose in january to 7.9%. so what is the current state of the economy? erika miller talked to two experts with different views. >> reporter: it may seem strange to many investors that the stock market can be hovering at five- year highs, when the economy is so weak. but what's fueling the rally is not the current situation, it's hope. >> we've taken out some of the downside tail risks. so, we're feeling like although it's not
erican greetings, proud sponsor of "the electric company." agreement from the u.s. department of education's ready to learn grant, and viewers like you, thank you. go online now to pbskidsgo.org and play some electric company games. you can win points forll of your favorite people, or your most favorite person, me, manny spamboni. now go, because the next time i see you, i better have more points. you're almost there! i need that cheese. you got it, you got it! come on, buddy, i need the cheese. and didn't we know how to a...da -- sorry. (laughter) ooh, i threw my neck out! captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> susie: good evening. i'm susie gharib. hewlett-packard's turnaround gains traction, c.e.o. meg whitman in with a winning quarter and an improved outlook. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. from weakening demand, to currency concerns, we look at what's behind the big selloff in commodities. >> susie: and u.s. companies and infrastructure are increasing under the threat of cyber attack. we look at a new plan tying safeguards to trade policy. >> tom: that and more tonight
in commodities. >> susie: and u.s. companies and infrastructure are increasing under the threat of cyber attack. we look at a new plan tying safeguards to trade policy. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: on the comeback trail, hewlett packard posting better than expected first quarter results tonight, as a wide- ranging revamp of the struggling computer maker takes hold. and its shares take flight, rising over 6% in after hours trading. h.p. earned $0.82 a share, $0.11 better than wall street had anticipated. and revenues, while down at $28.4 billion, also beat the street. c.e.o. meg whitman has been on the job 17 months, speaking with investors today, whitman said she felt good about the rest of the year, and that last year's hard work was paying off for h.p. but, analysts say h.p. is not out of the woods yet. >> it's the type of thing that can be fixed quickly. this isn't going to take several years to play out so first of all it seems like meck whitman's vision is very much on track but we're not seeing that play out in the financials, but it is encouraging that guidance wa
problems remain one of the biggest hurdles to growth. the u.s. is running an annual deficit of $1.1 trillion. >> we still have some fiscal speed bumps coming. and then we have the question of what they actually do on the fiscal side. so, right now, the economy and the fiscal situation are wrapped up into one really nasty ball of wax. >> reporter: keep in mind that many of the international problems that have existed for more than a year haven't gone away. slowing economies in europe and china could slow global growth. and conflict with iran could push up energy prices. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: joining us now with more on what to expect from president obama's state of the union address, david gordon, head of research at the eurasia group in washington d.c. >> so if you heard from our report, david, it's all about the economy. that's the big interest for most americans. what can the president propose tomorrow that will get the economy moving without some kind of big stimulus plan? >> so i think that the president's going to try to do a couple of things. first he's
ahead on our program tonight, ford is hiring in high oy, please take a look creating new job. the u.s. economy is not adding jobs, the claims for uninsurance benefits up pas past-- combined with continued worries about economic growth lead the major stroke averages lower within the s&p 500 off by 9.5. >> susie: stocks weren't the only investments falling today. many commodities also ended lower, on top of steep declines yesterday. u.s. oil futures fell to there lowest point this year, closing at $92.84 a barrel. so what's at the root of the commodities sell-off, and will it continue? erika miller reports. >> reporter: selling was heavy in crude oil today, as it was in most commodities. but crude also fell on new inventory data showing a big jump in oil supplies. >> today we had an inventory number which came out, which we were expecting a build of around two million barrels. we got a build of around four million barrels. >> reporter: across the room, gold futures were little changed. although industrial metals like platinum and palladium got slammed. grain prices also plunged, with wh
of the market-- including u.s. government officials who in 2007 publicly stated that problems in the subprime market appeared to be contained." >> reporter: s&p goes on to argue that the securities at issue in the justice department's case were reviewed by another ratings agen and received the same rating. s&p says it also began downgrading many mortgage securities in 2006, warning that conditions in the housing market were deteriorating. but critics say what matters is what s&p claimed at the time it stamped securities triple a. >> the ratings agencies claim that they have unique analytic abilities and very sophisticated models that enable them to determine the credit worthiness of a bond, a derivative, a security. >> rorter: s&p pointout cou rulings he diissed what it called challenges to a credit rating made with 20/20 hindsight. if the justice department does sue, standard and poor's says it will vigorously defend itself. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: still ahead, tonight's word on the street: consumers, the street.com's david peltier joins us with some consumer product stoc
, but not on saturdays. the u.s. postal service is dropping saturday letter deliveries to save billions. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. fresh pain at the pump. american drivers see a steep jump in gas prices: up 15 cents a gallon in the past week alone. >> susie: and the federal reserve says it's been hit, by cyber hackers. we look at u.s. businesses and just how safe their networks are. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the u.s. postal service says this summer it will stop delivering mail on saturdays, ending a service that began 150 years ago. cutting back to a five-day a week schedule will save $2- billion. the post office has been losing about $20 million a day, as e- mail useage ramps up and mail volume plunges. congress has required the post office to deliver six days a week, but the postmaster general believes there is a loophole in the law that will allow him to make the change. darren gersh reports on the business fallout. >> reporter: first class mail is the postal service's most profitable product. it is also a business that is disappearing at the rate of 5% a year. >> people pay
agreement from the u.s. department of education's ready to learn grant, and viewers like you, thank you. play awesome electric company games and earn points for your favorite person, like me, hector. i mean, i'm your favorite, right? so what are you waiting for? i'm great at telling people what to do. hey kids! pick up that trash. kidding with these, right? hey! (sneezing) bless you! captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> tom: good evening. i'm tom hudson. susie is off tonight. the easy talk, but difficult plans to meet the challenge of creating more middle class jobs. finance ministers and central bankers from the world's biggest economies meet to debate spending cuts versus growth. we look at international investing and pockets of strength around the globe. and, hedge fund manager carl icahn ups his stake in herbalife, calling the vitamin maker a legit business. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." investors spent much of this week focused on the u.s. market with major market indexes hitting five-year highs. but now the spotlight is shifting overseas. g-20 finance minister
is starting to return. >> reporter: sure, the u.s. economy may be outperforming most other developed nations. but some investment strategists see good opportunities in the weakest parts the world like europe. >> although growth is still negative, we do believe that this year will be that tipping point where growth returns positive. and things are getting progressively just a little less bad. >> reporter: he recommends buying the stocks of big european companies that get much of their revenues outside the region. >> you've got a lot of companies based in these countries which sell to the emerging markets and that growing consumer within the emerging markets. i think you're seeing a lot of >> reporter: but others have a country specific approach. wells fargo advisors has norway as a top pick. >> not only is it a country with relatively low debt and a good credit standing, but it's also a country that's the 15th largest oil exporter in the world. and we think oil prices will continue to edge higher here. >> reporter: but, remember, even if you just buy stocks of big american companies, you like
. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." investors spent much of this week focused on the u.s. market with major market indexes hitting five-year highs. but now the spotlight is shifting overseas. g-20 finance ministers and central bankers are meeting in moscow over the weekend. they will be debating the need for austerity, versus the need to spur growth. no one expects a quick turnaround for the european economy, which has been mired in recession. but as erika miller reports, that may make now a good time to invest. >> reporter: it would makes sense that american investors would be loading up on u.s. stocks with the market here doing so well. but they're not. last week, investors in stock mutual funds put virtually all their cash in international markets. more than $3 billion went into funds holding international stocks. by comparison, mutual funds holding u.s. stocks suffered their first outflows of the year. investment advisors say small investors may be on to something. >> international investing has had a bad reputation over the last couple of years had a bad experience, people have taken money ou
the road. speaking of delays, it could create big ones at the airport. that according to the u.s. travel association. some republicans argue, that's all exaggerated. let's have our own bruce leshan sort it all out. >> nearly 2/3 of us already think flying is too much of a hassle. the u.s. travel association says the sequester is likely to smack us with even more headaches. >> completely unacceptable. we have to get it together. >> they are saying we can't prosecute them for a job not well done. >> travel experts say if the sequestered cuts go through, you could just see a sea of red on these airport messaging boards. delay, delay, delay. it could take you an hour to get through the tsa check points, two to three hours if you have to get through customs. >> is there any hope you'll solve this by friday? >> there's hope, there's optimism. people who say we can't do it. >> the transportation secretary says $689 million in faa cuts will force him to furlough employees, including air traffic controllers and safety inspectors. tsa workers will face seven days of furloughs. the travel as
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 96 (some duplicates have been removed)

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